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home : society : society July 27, 2015


Pay My Bill

3/13/2013 6:00:00 AM
Just among friends
By RACHEL EVANS


"Blessed to be a blessing," Genesis 12:2-3. Upon telephoning the home of Mack and Gloria Williams Emmons in Meridian on Friday, March 1, one received the following message, "You have reached a blessed home. We have been married 54 years today." Every caller received a blessing. Happy Anniversary, Mack and Gloria!

-

Don't try telling Bobby Hardy that reaching eighty years of age is bad news.

He has loved every minute of it!

The celebration began on Saturday afternoon, Feb. 16 when his family and friends gathered for a Mardi Gras-style party at his and Joyce's camp house in the North Bend community.

Betty Hardy and Shannon Hoover decorated everything in the camp house with Mardi Gras-bling, even the deer head on the wall wore beads.

Mary Lee Williams passed out the festive bangles to the guests as they arrived.

Mike Hardy paid tribute to his dad with a toast.

He and Sarah assisted Joyce in entertaining, along with Walter and Betty Hardy, Shannon and Randy Hoover, Kate Thomas, Jimmy Addy, Shirley Cox, Rachel Evans, Jean Fulton and Bridgett Fulton. Lynda Hardy baked both a Mardi Gras cake and a birthday cake for the party which marked the celebration of four scores. The long buffet table laden with afternoon goodies, included the shrimp and grits tasty favorite.

Michael Hardy and Madison Hardy, now of Nashville, provided musical entertainment at the party honoring their "Pop" on his birthday.

They were accompanied by Daniel Dennis, also of Nashville.

Guests from Philadelphia included Art and Jean Fulton, Sue Fulton, Carla, Ike and Issac Martin, Mary Lee and Nancy Williams, Perry and Narcy Walker, Cindy, Anne Taylor and Olivia Adams, Jerry and Tommie Hardy, Al and Bridgett Fulton, Marianne and Romily Enochs, Babs Kirkland, Marvin and Mary Louise Blanks, and Don Wroble.

Also, Bill and Nancy Yates, Clarice Williamson, Allen and Newlyn Brantley, Johnny and Jeb Stuart, Chuck and Tammy Burk, Pat and Jo Helen Daly, Dr. Bill Molpus, Billie Latting, Joe and Edna Hegwood, Helen Thomasson, Alice Rowe, Rebecca Barnett, Rachel Evans, Tom and Shirley Cox, Don and Evelyn Perry and Steve and Charlene Webb.

Out-of-town guests included Jerry and Jimmy Addy of Oxford, Kate Thomas of Union, Maribeth Stuart of Booneville, Walter and Betty Laura Hardy and Randy, Shannon and Brett Hoover of Vicksburg, Joe L. Pigott of Tylertown and Linda Sanderson of Florence.

Also, Dr. Frank Y. Rogers of Harrisville, Bo and Jane Johnson of Meridian, Ben and Jan Evans, Butch and Cindy Jenkins, and Ava Hatch of Madison, Sid and Lou Anne Asken of Raymond, Kipps and Carol Webb of Southaven, Will Simons of Winter Haven, Florida and Terri McCarver of Brandon.

Following the party, Joyce surprised Bobby with a trip to Winter Haven, Florida to visit Jerry and Carol Smith. The two couples had become friends forty years earlier when they were living in Vicksburg.

-

For the past few years, we have followed Dr. Bill Molpus on medical mission trips to such places as Cambodia, Uganda, Madagascar, Panama, Africa, etc., and we understand his choice of destinations.

He goes where the need is the greatest.

But when it comes to selecting sites for a holiday, we wonder!

Last week we shared the excitement of six-year-old Pete Peebles' birthday trip to Disney World.

Many of you share my love for the beach, or Sue and Glenn Wells' choice of the mountains. Bill selected to vacation in Myanmar, Mandalay, Bagan and Inle Lake! Hello!

Was I the only one who missed the geography lesson that day? Reading of Bill's travels has made me wish I had paid more attention to the study of our world and her peoples. This is our chance at a make-up test.

After touring Myanmar with Bill last week, we now join him in Mandalay. The only thing I know about Mandalay (Amy Johnston confirmed it on her computer) is the song Frank Sinatra sang which was inspired by Rudyard Kipling's poem entitled, "Mandalay."

The lyrics in part, "Looking eastward to the sea, there is a Burma girl a sitting. I know that she waits for me."

Remember? From Bill we learn that Mandalay's well laid out streets are in a gridiron like Manhattan, making it easy to get around. More pagodas.

You had to remove your shoes and socks and leave them at the entrance.

"Please Lord, don't let anyone get my New Balance! I finally bought some flip flops and left my new Balance safely in the car."

Interesting visits to several workshops making huge statues of Buddha.

Saw this one guy on a ladder carrying a fifteen-foot block of marble with an electric saw. Another place, they were doing bronze castings for a thirty-foot statue of Buddha for a temple in Vietnam.

Flew from Mandalay to Bagan - deeper and deeper into the remote areas of Burma. Visited a beautiful fruit and vegetable market and watched them prepare an opaque cream like substance from the bark of a special tree.

The ladies put this on their faces in various designs as a sunscreen and to keep their skin smooth. I had seen women with this stuff on their faces in Madagascar but had no idea they were using it as a sunscreen.

There was a guy preparing beetle nut for chewing.

Beetle nut grows on what looks like a palm tree in tropical areas of the world. They remove the shell and slice the round nut.

They place this on a special leaf that has been coated with lime, add some tobacco, and fold it up into a ball. Most of the folks chew this all the time.

It turns the inside of their mouths and lips a bright red. After years of chewing, a black tar covers all the teeth. Disgusting to say the least. Now they forbid anyone working in the tourist industry to use this stuff.

Bagan is famous for its more than 4,000 pagodas.

The earliest and most famous ones date back to the 11th and 12th century.

The main method of transportation is the horse cart. My schedule prevented me from taking the hot air balloon ride. That would have been spectacular!

I flew from Bagan to Inle Lake, not realizing that this would be the highlight of my tour in Burma. The lake is huge, like an ocean. It was a Burmese Venice! The boats were 45-feet long and very narrow, three feet at the widest point. The motor had a long-tail shaft. Similar to the long-tail boats in Bangkok. Villages were built in the water - on teak silts. Get ready for this - they had floating gardens which never needed watering! The main crop was tomatoes, most of which were exported to China. My hotel was built on these stilts. The rooms were rows of small cottages connected by a walkway.

After breakfast, I got into my boat and spent the day sight seeing.

The fishermen had a different type boat.

It was a flat canoe-like boat about twenty feet long.

The fisherman stood on one foot at the end of the boat and paddled with the other foot, leaving his hands free to work the net. That was a sight to see, and there were hundreds of these guys all over the lake.

At this point, I was "pagodated out," and told my guide I would only visit one pagoda, one monastery, you decide.

It had been a fascinating journey and I was not ready to leave.

On my flight back to Yangon, I relived the entire trip.

My beautiful Yangon guide met me at the airport and took me for my farewell dinner.

We met with the director of the tour company, an Italian guy from Milano. He wanted a face-to-face meeting, and an evaluation of the tour in English or Italian.

I do know some Italian superlatives, and enthusiastically gave him a glowing report. Ciao!

Back to the airport and onto the flight to Seoul, South Korea.

Another day would pass, and I would arrive back home, safe and sound. Can't wait until December!"

To set the record straight, Bill is not referring to the wonder of the Christmas season, with all its sights and sounds and smells.

Remember, he told us that Joyce Meyer's Hand of Hope Ministries had been cleared for a mission to Myanmar in December?

Perhaps he'll send us a Christmas card.

-

This is a squirrel camp story and don't tell me that squirrel season is over!

Just like deer season and the Neshoba County Fair, squirrel season is never over.

It is either after or before.

Quoting Bill Yates, whose father, Mr. Hugh Yates, started this particular deer camp in the 60's, "We start thinking about it in July, and get excited planning it." According to another son, Lynn Yates, "Daddy started going to the Pearl River swamp in a wagon with a mule in the 30's and 40's before we were born."

Munch George, the grandfather of Debbie Burt Myers, our Managing Editor, was among the pioneer squirrel hunters.

Since then the camp has moved from Nanih Waiya where "the mosquitoes just ate us up," to its present location in the "more mosquito-free environment of the Choctaw Wild Life Management area near Ackerman."

The camp has added more hunters through the years. According to Bill and Lynn, "We had one tent back in the 60's, an old canvas tent about 10 by 12 feet, and we had 11 people sleeping in there."

Mr. Hugh took brothers Sam and Joe Nowell under wing when Sam was three years old and their dad was killed in a train accident. They are among the new faces in the camp, along with Joe's grandsons, Matthew Nowell, 5, and Zack Nowell, 13.

Posing the question Brian Albert Broom asked in the article he wrote for The Clarion Ledger in December 2012, "What is it about sleeping on the ground in tents, waking before any self-respecting rooster ever would, and chasing bushy-tails for three days straight, that would make Squirrel Camp an event that keeps some of these guys coming back for half a century?"

Lynn's reply, "Just something about walking through the woods and enjoying the Lord's landscape," to which his brother Bill added, "It is being outdoors and the fellowship." Whatever. It is always in season.

-

Although I can only recall being in his presence on two occasions, I hurt over the loss of Dr. Donald W. Zacharias.

He was at the head of the class among Mississippi greats.



"Blessed to be a blessing," Genesis 12:2-3. Upon telephoning the home of Mack and Gloria Williams Emmons in Meridian on Friday, March 1, one received the following message, "You have reached a blessed home. We have been married 54 years today." Every caller received a blessing. Happy Anniversary, Mack and Gloria!

-

Don't try telling Bobby Hardy that reaching eighty years of age is bad news.

He has loved every minute of it!

The celebration began on Saturday afternoon, Feb. 16 when his family and friends gathered for a Mardi Gras-style party at his and Joyce's camp house in the North Bend community.

Betty Hardy and Shannon Hoover decorated everything in the camp house with Mardi Gras-bling, even the deer head on the wall wore beads.

Mary Lee Williams passed out the festive bangles to the guests as they arrived.

Mike Hardy paid tribute to his dad with a toast.

He and Sarah assisted Joyce in entertaining, along with Walter and Betty Hardy, Shannon and Randy Hoover, Kate Thomas, Jimmy Addy, Shirley Cox, Rachel Evans, Jean Fulton and Bridgett Fulton. Lynda Hardy baked both a Mardi Gras cake and a birthday cake for the party which marked the celebration of four scores. The long buffet table laden with afternoon goodies, included the shrimp and grits tasty favorite.

Michael Hardy and Madison Hardy, now of Nashville, provided musical entertainment at the party honoring their "Pop" on his birthday.

They were accompanied by Daniel Dennis, also of Nashville.

Guests from Philadelphia included Art and Jean Fulton, Sue Fulton, Carla, Ike and Issac Martin, Mary Lee and Nancy Williams, Perry and Narcy Walker, Cindy, Anne Taylor and Olivia Adams, Jerry and Tommie Hardy, Al and Bridgett Fulton, Marianne and Romily Enochs, Babs Kirkland, Marvin and Mary Louise Blanks, and Don Wroble.

Also, Bill and Nancy Yates, Clarice Williamson, Allen and Newlyn Brantley, Johnny and Jeb Stuart, Chuck and Tammy Burk, Pat and Jo Helen Daly, Dr. Bill Molpus, Billie Latting, Joe and Edna Hegwood, Helen Thomasson, Alice Rowe, Rebecca Barnett, Rachel Evans, Tom and Shirley Cox, Don and Evelyn Perry and Steve and Charlene Webb.

Out-of-town guests included Jerry and Jimmy Addy of Oxford, Kate Thomas of Union, Maribeth Stuart of Booneville, Walter and Betty Laura Hardy and Randy, Shannon and Brett Hoover of Vicksburg, Joe L. Pigott of Tylertown and Linda Sanderson of Florence.

Also, Dr. Frank Y. Rogers of Harrisville, Bo and Jane Johnson of Meridian, Ben and Jan Evans, Butch and Cindy Jenkins, and Ava Hatch of Madison, Sid and Lou Anne Asken of Raymond, Kipps and Carol Webb of Southaven, Will Simons of Winter Haven, Florida and Terri McCarver of Brandon.

Following the party, Joyce surprised Bobby with a trip to Winter Haven, Florida to visit Jerry and Carol Smith. The two couples had become friends forty years earlier when they were living in Vicksburg.

-

For the past few years, we have followed Dr. Bill Molpus on medical mission trips to such places as Cambodia, Uganda, Madagascar, Panama, Africa, etc., and we understand his choice of destinations.

He goes where the need is the greatest.

But when it comes to selecting sites for a holiday, we wonder!

Last week we shared the excitement of six-year-old Pete Peebles' birthday trip to Disney World.

Many of you share my love for the beach, or Sue and Glenn Wells' choice of the mountains. Bill selected to vacation in Myanmar, Mandalay, Bagan and Inle Lake! Hello!

Was I the only one who missed the geography lesson that day? Reading of Bill's travels has made me wish I had paid more attention to the study of our world and her peoples. This is our chance at a make-up test.

After touring Myanmar with Bill last week, we now join him in Mandalay. The only thing I know about Mandalay (Amy Johnston confirmed it on her computer) is the song Frank Sinatra sang which was inspired by Rudyard Kipling's poem entitled, "Mandalay."

The lyrics in part, "Looking eastward to the sea, there is a Burma girl a sitting. I know that she waits for me."

Remember? From Bill we learn that Mandalay's well laid out streets are in a gridiron like Manhattan, making it easy to get around. More pagodas.

You had to remove your shoes and socks and leave them at the entrance.

"Please Lord, don't let anyone get my New Balance! I finally bought some flip flops and left my new Balance safely in the car."

Interesting visits to several workshops making huge statues of Buddha.

Saw this one guy on a ladder carrying a fifteen-foot block of marble with an electric saw. Another place, they were doing bronze castings for a thirty-foot statue of Buddha for a temple in Vietnam.

Flew from Mandalay to Bagan - deeper and deeper into the remote areas of Burma. Visited a beautiful fruit and vegetable market and watched them prepare an opaque cream like substance from the bark of a special tree.

The ladies put this on their faces in various designs as a sunscreen and to keep their skin smooth. I had seen women with this stuff on their faces in Madagascar but had no idea they were using it as a sunscreen.

There was a guy preparing beetle nut for chewing.

Beetle nut grows on what looks like a palm tree in tropical areas of the world. They remove the shell and slice the round nut.

They place this on a special leaf that has been coated with lime, add some tobacco, and fold it up into a ball. Most of the folks chew this all the time.

It turns the inside of their mouths and lips a bright red. After years of chewing, a black tar covers all the teeth. Disgusting to say the least. Now they forbid anyone working in the tourist industry to use this stuff.

Bagan is famous for its more than 4,000 pagodas.

The earliest and most famous ones date back to the 11th and 12th century.

The main method of transportation is the horse cart. My schedule prevented me from taking the hot air balloon ride. That would have been spectacular!

I flew from Bagan to Inle Lake, not realizing that this would be the highlight of my tour in Burma. The lake is huge, like an ocean. It was a Burmese Venice! The boats were 45-feet long and very narrow, three feet at the widest point. The motor had a long-tail shaft. Similar to the long-tail boats in Bangkok. Villages were built in the water - on teak silts. Get ready for this - they had floating gardens which never needed watering! The main crop was tomatoes, most of which were exported to China. My hotel was built on these stilts. The rooms were rows of small cottages connected by a walkway.

After breakfast, I got into my boat and spent the day sight seeing.

The fishermen had a different type boat.

It was a flat canoe-like boat about twenty feet long.

The fisherman stood on one foot at the end of the boat and paddled with the other foot, leaving his hands free to work the net. That was a sight to see, and there were hundreds of these guys all over the lake.

At this point, I was "pagodated out," and told my guide I would only visit one pagoda, one monastery, you decide.

It had been a fascinating journey and I was not ready to leave.

On my flight back to Yangon, I relived the entire trip.

My beautiful Yangon guide met me at the airport and took me for my farewell dinner.

We met with the director of the tour company, an Italian guy from Milano. He wanted a face-to-face meeting, and an evaluation of the tour in English or Italian.

I do know some Italian superlatives, and enthusiastically gave him a glowing report. Ciao!

Back to the airport and onto the flight to Seoul, South Korea.

Another day would pass, and I would arrive back home, safe and sound. Can't wait until December!"

To set the record straight, Bill is not referring to the wonder of the Christmas season, with all its sights and sounds and smells.

Remember, he told us that Joyce Meyer's Hand of Hope Ministries had been cleared for a mission to Myanmar in December?

Perhaps he'll send us a Christmas card.

-

This is a squirrel camp story and don't tell me that squirrel season is over!

Just like deer season and the Neshoba County Fair, squirrel season is never over.

It is either after or before.

Quoting Bill Yates, whose father, Mr. Hugh Yates, started this particular deer camp in the 60's, "We start thinking about it in July, and get excited planning it." According to another son, Lynn Yates, "Daddy started going to the Pearl River swamp in a wagon with a mule in the 30's and 40's before we were born."

Munch George, the grandfather of Debbie Burt Myers, our Managing Editor, was among the pioneer squirrel hunters.

Since then the camp has moved from Nanih Waiya where "the mosquitoes just ate us up," to its present location in the "more mosquito-free environment of the Choctaw Wild Life Management area near Ackerman."

The camp has added more hunters through the years. According to Bill and Lynn, "We had one tent back in the 60's, an old canvas tent about 10 by 12 feet, and we had 11 people sleeping in there."

Mr. Hugh took brothers Sam and Joe Nowell under wing when Sam was three years old and their dad was killed in a train accident. They are among the new faces in the camp, along with Joe's grandsons, Matthew Nowell, 5, and Zack Nowell, 13.

Posing the question Brian Albert Broom asked in the article he wrote for The Clarion Ledger in December 2012, "What is it about sleeping on the ground in tents, waking before any self-respecting rooster ever would, and chasing bushy-tails for three days straight, that would make Squirrel Camp an event that keeps some of these guys coming back for half a century?"

Lynn's reply, "Just something about walking through the woods and enjoying the Lord's landscape," to which his brother Bill added, "It is being outdoors and the fellowship." Whatever. It is always in season.

-

Although I can only recall being in his presence on two occasions, I hurt over the loss of Dr. Donald W. Zacharias.

He was at the head of the class among Mississippi greats.






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