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  • The Florida Klansman refused to give his real name.
  • The Florida Klansman refused to give his real name.
  • Our View – Forty-one years later, justice is finally served for Edgar Ray Killen. On June 21, 1964, James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner were murdered along a dark roadside in Neshoba County. Exactly 41 years later, Edgar Ray Killen became the first man to be convicted on state charges related to the horrific murders. The irony of 41 years elapsing before justice was served, at least partially, should not be forgotten.
  • Our View – Forty-one years later, justice is finally served for Edgar Ray Killen. On June 21, 1964, James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner were murdered along a dark roadside in Neshoba County. Exactly 41 years later, Edgar Ray Killen became the first man to be convicted on state charges related to the horrific murders. The irony of 41 years elapsing before justice was served, at least partially, should not be forgotten.
  • I was one of the first two reporters to arrive in Philadelphia, Miss., in 1964, on the day Mickey Schwerner, James Chaney and Andrew Goodman went missing. I was there as Newsweek’s main reporter on the Southern civil rights beat, and I went directly to the courthouse with Claude Sitton of the New York Times to question Sheriff Lawrence Rainey and Deputy Cecil Price.
  • I was one of the first two reporters to arrive in Philadelphia, Miss., in 1964, on the day Mickey Schwerner, James Chaney and Andrew Goodman went missing. I was there as Newsweek’s main reporter on the Southern civil rights beat, and I went directly to the courthouse with Claude Sitton of the New York Times to question Sheriff Lawrence Rainey and Deputy Cecil Price.
  • As the Killen trial closed last week, Judge Marcus Gordon made some interesting comments about the scores of news reporters, photographers and producers that had been hard at work in Philadelphia for weeks.
  • As the Killen trial closed last week, Judge Marcus Gordon made some interesting comments about the scores of news reporters, photographers and producers that had been hard at work in Philadelphia for weeks.
  • There’s no dateline on this column to note where it was written. Technically, it was done in Tupelo, but the column actually originated in Philadelphia.
  • There’s no dateline on this column to note where it was written. Technically, it was done in Tupelo, but the column actually originated in Philadelphia.
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