An Oka Homa Ohoyo player charges with the ball during Monday's action in the women's division of the World Series of Stickball. The tournament is part of the annual Choctaw Indian Fair. The women's championship game was played Tuesday night.
An Oka Homa Ohoyo player charges with the ball during Monday's action in the women's division of the World Series of Stickball. The tournament is part of the annual Choctaw Indian Fair. The women's championship game was played Tuesday night.
The World Series of Stickball is in full swing at the 64th annual Choctaw Indian Fair.

The action started with early round games last week and over the weekend. Everyone is looking to see whether Koni Hata can win the Men's Division for the third year in a row. Last year, they defeated Beaver Dam in the championship game which ended in a 3-2 decision.

The championships of the women's division and men's 35 division were to be settled on Tuesday. The tough semifinals of the men's division will be held Thursday and Friday nights, each starting after 10 p.m. Those games will settle who plays for the championship on Saturday night.

Stickball is described as the little brother of war, and it lives up to its reputation each year. In last year's championship game, Beaver Dam did not go down without a fight. Koni Hata scored with about 10 minutes left in the fourth quarter and held on for the victory. Beaver Dam kept the ball near the Koni Hata goal for most of the time remaining but Koni Hata's defense did not break and time ran out.

Stickball is a traditional game for the Choctaw Indians which dates back for centuries. Instead of wars, disputes between communities were settled by stickball games. According to Choctaw information, games were first record in the 1700s.

That competition continues this weekend.