Over 50 copies of “Banjo’s Dream, a collection of drawings featuring family pet, Banjo, were signed in downtown Philadelphia last week by author and cartoonist Marshall Ramsey. The Georgia native spent over two hours promoting his fourth published book during the month “Third Thursday” sales event.
Over 50 copies of “Banjo’s Dream, a collection of drawings featuring family pet, Banjo, were signed in downtown Philadelphia last week by author and cartoonist Marshall Ramsey. The Georgia native spent over two hours promoting his fourth published book during the month “Third Thursday” sales event.
Cartoonist Marshall Ramsey signed over 50 copies of his new book "Banjo's Dream," a collection of drawings featuring the family pet, Banjo, during "Third Thursday" at Kademi last week.

Ramsey, a Georgia native, spent over two hours promoting his fourth published book and chatting with many as he signed personal messages.

He also drew a picture of Banjo with a bowl of food in each book.

"He said this was one of the best signings he'd ever done," Kademi co-owner Dawn Lee Chalmers said. "He sold over 50 copies of "Banjo's Dream" and 15 to 20 copies of his other books."

Chalmers said she enjoyed having Ramsey at her store, describing him as "funny and witty."

"We had so much fun that he stayed an hour and a half after we closed," she said.

"I think he has a wonderful sense of humor and he's fun to watch."

Banjo, a Border Terrier, was a rescue dog Ramsey and his family picked up over 10 years ago. Banjo died at the age of 14.

"This book is in his honor," Ramsey said. "And it's for dreamers everywhere."

Going from A to Z, the book features Banjo in a number of professions including a quarterback and a knight.

"I loved illustrating him as Sherlock Holmes [under I for investigator] and as a cowboy," Ramsey said, noting his three kids helped by sharing ideas.

My 13-year-old son said the pictures were of a "nice quality," my 11-year-old liked the detail and my 6-year-old liked seeing Banjo again, he said.

"They were all glad to see their puppy again," Ramsey said.

The Ramseys were the third family to care for Banjo.

"He walked in and burrowed into our hearts," Ramsey said.

Banjo has featured prominently in Ramsey's works including being on the cover of his previous book "Fried Chicken & Wine."

He even had 1,800 followers on Twitter.

To get Ramsey to her store, Chalmers said she sent him a message on Facebook asking for a case of his books to sell.

"I then asked if he wanted to do a signing here," she said. "He said he would love to come to Philadelphia."

Chalmers added that the turnout was great, drawing in the normal customers and even a few first timers.

We had six men come in that had never been inside, she said.

Ramsey himself enjoyed the evening, showing off various pictures of Banjo and his other dogs, Bullet and Pip.

At age 10 Banjo developed diabetes and Ramsey recalls having to give him shots twice a day.

"But that didn't slow him down. He kept on loving life and us."

When he turned 14 Banjo developed pancreatitis, a painful disease that Ramsey said should have killed him but Banjo "had a strong will to live."

He lived for three more months before passing away in Ramsey's wife's arms.

"Banjo taught me how important a strong will to live truly is," Ramsey wrote. "And he taught me the importance of dreams."

After his passing the Ramseys received over 200 condolences.

Ramsey has already begun his next book that he says will be a combination of cartoons, funny Facebook comments and short stories.

Outside of books, Ramsey is the radio host of the Marshall Ramsey Show on the SuperTalk Mississippi network and the part-time cartoonist for The Clarion-Ledger.

His work is also syndicated nationally by Creators Syndicate.

He also owns Tiny Wheels Media, a company that provides humorous and inspirational content.

Ramsey was named a Pulitzer Finalist in 2002 and 2006.