Children filled the Shield of Faith Ministries’  float during Saturday’s annual Dr. Martin King Jr. Celebration in downtown Philadelphia. The parade drew about 40 entries including bands from Philadelphia, Velma Jackson, Holmes County and Canton.  A program, featuring the Rev. Steve Mosley and Shaun Seales as guest speakers, was held Monday at Westside Community Center.
Children filled the Shield of Faith Ministries’ float during Saturday’s annual Dr. Martin King Jr. Celebration in downtown Philadelphia. The parade drew about 40 entries including bands from Philadelphia, Velma Jackson, Holmes County and Canton. A program, featuring the Rev. Steve Mosley and Shaun Seales as guest speakers, was held Monday at Westside Community Center.
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. would be sad to see what people here are doing to one another, a Neshoba County minister said Monday at an observance.

The Rev. Steve Mosley, pastor of the Church of Hope on Mississippi 16 east, told a crowd gathered for Dr. King's annual birthday celebration at Westside Community Center on Monday that Dr. King was their big brother, their leader, their Moses and their voice.

"Dr. King is no longer here," Mosley said. "That is why he had the dream, why he had the vision."

The mother of a man shot last week called Mosley on Saturday and asked him to pray for her son.

"She told me that was her son with bullets in his chest," Mosley said.

He told the crowd gathered for the annual program that the young men dying in the streets were their children as well.

"We need to stop depending on someone else to save our children," he said. "We are in trouble. There are things that are happening that we don't even know about yet. If we lose another generation, it is a wrap. If we lose one more generation, it is over. These young guys that are in the streets are probably somewhere right now possibly breaking into your houses. They are lazy and they don't want to work. If you don't have a job, create a job - rake some leaves, pick up some cans. There is money out there that you don't even have to go to the unemployment office to get. Dr. King would be hurt."

Mosley said the politically correct thing to say is: Everybody is against us.

"The correct thing to say is we are our own worse enemy," he said. "Dr. King would be sad to see what we are doing to one another. He marched for us. He went to jail for us."

Mosley encouraged the community, the clergy and the churches to come together and stop the violence.

"Our wives are tired. Our mothers are tired," he said, noting that a man's presence is needed in the lives of the community's children and grandchildren.

He told those in attendance that people used to say they were afraid for our children. Now, people are saying they are afraid of our children, he said.

He encouraged community members to go beyond the walls on the church and try and reach those involved in the violence.

"If we are going to get our young men back we must come out of our buildings," Mosley said.

In addition, he challenged residents to start with the youngest generation, pointing to a child around age 2.

He said youngsters need to be taught early to say yes ma'am and yes sir.

"I'm 53 years old and I still say it because my mother taught me to say it to everyone," Mosley said.

He also shared some words of wisdom with the young men in attendance at the program.

"Young men, if you are going for a job application and your pants are sagging, that one is going in the garbage can," he said.

Also speaking at Monday's program was Shaun Seales, who told those in attendance that it would be his last speech.

He said it was time to stop talking and time go to work.

Seales said it was time for the youth in the community to stop demanding that things be "given" to them. He voiced opposition to the mindset that "everybody is a winner" and "everyone should get a trophy."

He said young men and women should be rewarded for working hard not walking around with guns and playing video games all day long.

Seales said he planned to start a non-profit outreach program to aid young people.

The Rev. Johnny Beckwith began Monday's program with a prayer. Eva Tisdale gave the welcome and occasion.

Elijah Chapman recited from Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech and received a standing ovation.

Morning Star Church Choir presented one song. Seales shared the stakeholder of community involvement.

Brothers in Christ from Truelight Baptist Church of Walnut Grove gave a religious performance. The Rev. Harold Coburn introduced the guest speaker.