Jobs will be a top priority for Mayor James A. Young when he and the newly-elected Board of Aldermen after they take their oaths of office Monday at 9 a.m. at City Hall. In addition, Young said he wants to balance the city’s general fund budget, which has operated with a deficit for the past six year.
Jobs will be a top priority for Mayor James A. Young when he and the newly-elected Board of Aldermen after they take their oaths of office Monday at 9 a.m. at City Hall. In addition, Young said he wants to balance the city’s general fund budget, which has operated with a deficit for the past six year.
As he begins his second term Monday, Mayor James A. Young said jobs would be his top priority.

In addition, he wants to balance the city's general fund budget, which has been operating with a deficit for the past six years.

Education and crime will also be among his priorities.

"It will be a broad stroke," Young said. "We need new jobs and businesses and we need to promote the city. We need to balance the budget."

Mayor Young plans to "grow the city" by working with other city, county and state officials to attract new jobs.

"Working together we will make this happen," he said.

The mayor listed four key areas that need to be addressed: jobs and new business, curtailing crime, supporting schools and working more closely with citizens in general.

When it comes to jobs, Mayor Young was confident that the near future would see an increase in the number of new businesses, particularly in the wake of a recent vote to allow liquor and wine sold in package stores and restaurants.

Chain restaurants are high on his "want list," he said, noting they would bring more tourism to the city.

"We have a different flavor here," he said, of the community.

Young said he was already talking with "interested parties" regarding new restaurants.

"We have to make the city appealing to prospective businesses and give them incentives to open here," he said.

Young also pledged to work to keep the Philadelphia WIN Job Center open in some manner, saying it was important to the community.

The AlphaGen project, which was expected to bring about 200 jobs to Philadelphia, is also still on the mayor's mind.

He hopes the company will eventually open in the former U.S. Motors building, but if that does not occur he plans to regroup and find someone else to take over the facility.

"If we work together the job can and will be done," he said.

The mayor plans to work closely with the police chief to help curtail crime and address such things as a possible curfew for children, additional training and tools for police officers and a neighborhood watch program.

While the Board of Aldermen had discussed the possibility of a curfew previously, Young said that the safety of children should always be a priority.

"There are too many on the streets late at night," he said. "We need to try to negate that."

Young also wants to keep the city officers properly trained and equipped with the right tools and vehicles.

"They are dealing with a high-powered criminal system," he said.

Young supports a neighborhood watch program where citizens could report any suspicious activity and help "get the criminals off the streets."

On education, Young reaffirmed his promise made during a candidate's forum hosted by Parents for Public Schools.

During the event he offered his support to the group and praised the city school district, suggesting that everyone should be involved in education.

Young reaffirmed his stance and promised to bring everyone together.

"We need to look at every area to motivate children," he said.

Mayor Young won re-election to second term during the June general election, polling 51 percent of the vote.