Holding the banner leading Saturday’s “Stop the Violence” march are, from left, the Rev. Steve Mosley, Ward 4 Alderman Cecil Nichols, Mayor James A. Young, Tiffany Miller and Shaun Seales. The march ended with a program at Booker T. Washington park where some friends and family members of recent crime victims spoke.
Holding the banner leading Saturday’s “Stop the Violence” march are, from left, the Rev. Steve Mosley, Ward 4 Alderman Cecil Nichols, Mayor James A. Young, Tiffany Miller and Shaun Seales. The march ended with a program at Booker T. Washington park where some friends and family members of recent crime victims spoke.
A march to promote better family values in wake of a recent wave of crime in west Philadelphia drew more than 50 people Saturday.

"We truly appreciate everyone, the citizens and pastors, for participating today," Mayor Young said. "It put a cold chill in my spirit to think we are walking around and every corner we touched, bloodshed has been there."

There have been 15 shooting incidents in the city since early summer, including the latest, on Friday where a man was shot three times on Ivy Street. (See story page 1)

The march started on Pearl Avenue near Philadelphia Apartments where Samuel Grady, 28, of 10520 Road 747, was killed in the parking lot on Oct. 31.

The crowd gathered around Mayor Young, who thanked everyone for being there and lead them all in a prayer.

The marchers traveled south down Loper Street, carrying a banner emblazoned with the phrase "Stop the Violence."

A procession of vehicles followed the marchers, including a white limousine at the rear.

The march continued along such streets as Lewis, Chestnut, Martin Luther King, Adams, Carver, Davis, Bell and Adkins, where most of the shootings have occurred.

Forty-five minutes later the march ended at the Booker T. Washington football field where a short program was held.

Young told the crowd that the march was the start of the fight against violence in the community.

"This next generation, we want them to grow up with some peace," he said, noting that the answer was to start with the children.

Agreeing with Mayor Young was District 5 Supervisor Obbie Riley, who said the issue was a community problem that begins in the home.

"We can't police this problem away but we can parent it away," he said, receiving a round of applause.

"We've got to do better in enforcing our youth. The only way we're going to fix the problem is we've got to personally take responsibility."

Riley added that citizens should also talk to the young men of the community.

"It's OK to say something to them," he said.

"It's OK to talk to them and encourage them when you see them do good. And it's OK to discipline them when you see them do wrong. The only way we can fix this problem is that we have to take ownership of it."

Tiffany Moore Miller told attendees that the mentality of people not taking notice of a problem unless it affected them was no good.

Miller was a friend of Terri Lee Gwyn, 29, who was killed on March 2.

Daniel Larry Williamson, 48, of 100 Sistrunk Ave., Lot 3, was sentenced to 20 years for manslaughter in connection with Gwyn's death. He also received 20 years for arson in the same case.

Miller encouraged those in attendance to talk to police and other authorities when they see something wrong.

The Rev. Steve Mosley led the crowd in a chant. When he said "A Change," they responded with "Must Come."

"When the community works together things will begin to happen," he said, periodically continuing his chant. "But as long as people stay in their own little corner we will never solve this problem."

The program ended with Shaun Seales, one of the organizers, asking those affected by the recent violence to come forward.

Joining him on stage were 14 people, all friends and family members of some of those injured or killed recent months.

Before closing, Mayor Young told attendees that a community-wide meeting to address violence is being planned for early December in Westside Community Center.

The program ended with a group prayer, led by Mayor Young with those in attendance holding hands.