A crew with Anderson Contracting overlook their work on a new culvert on Border Street just off Martin Luther King Drive. The work is part of a matching grant from the USDA's National Resources Conservation Service’s Emergency Watershed Protection Program to clean out and remove debris from ditches and streams in three separate areas of the city. Anderson Contracting, a Yazoo company, was awarded the project with a bid of $175,142 in September 2013, significantly lower than anticipated.
A crew with Anderson Contracting overlook their work on a new culvert on Border Street just off Martin Luther King Drive. The work is part of a matching grant from the USDA's National Resources Conservation Service’s Emergency Watershed Protection Program to clean out and remove debris from ditches and streams in three separate areas of the city. Anderson Contracting, a Yazoo company, was awarded the project with a bid of $175,142 in September 2013, significantly lower than anticipated.
Work is nearly complete on a $175,142 stabilization project in the city in an effort to mitigate flash flooding in areas along Border and Beacon streets and on Holland Avenue.

The final work is being done on Border Street, just off Martin Luther King Drive, where new culverts are being installed.

The city received a $350,200 matching grant from the USDA's National Resources Conservation Service's Emergency Watershed Protection program to clean out and remove debris from ditches and streams in three separate areas of the city.

Anderson Contracting, a Yazoo company, was awarded the project with a bid of $175,142 in September 2013, significantly lower than the grant.

"They're making pro-gress," Mayor James A. Young said of the project.

The mayor plans to pursue other grants for additional ditch stabilization in the city.

Along with Border Street, work was done along ditches and streams near the historic train depot on Beacon Street and on Holland Avenue near Griffis Motors and the county hospital.

Young said he hoped the work would be completed soon but recent winter weather has slowed the project.

This is not the first time the city has received grant monies for ditch work.

In summer of 2010, Simmons Erosion Control Inc. submitted the low bid to make improvements to streams and ditches between Range Avenue and Church Avenue on the northern edge of the cemetery.

This work was also done through an $112,800 grant provided by the USDA to remove debris from streams, protect destabilized stream banks and establish cover on critically eroding lands, among other improvements.

The project called for the bottom of the ditches to be concreted.

Mayor Young said once the current work is complete he hoped to apply for another grant.

"We're not done trying to clean out these ditches," he said.

Ward 4 Alderman Cecil Nichols said other grants would help alleviate flooding in several other areas of the city, many in his own ward.

"It's going to help so the flooding won't be as bad," he said.

Young said that the next area he would like targeted is on Valley View Drive.

"It would qualify," he said. "We need to get an engineer to assess it first."

Alderman Nichols added that other areas to look at included Chestnut and Ivy streets, both of which are north of Border Street.

"We're looking for other areas to continue work on clearing the flood zones," he said.

Clearing these ditches is part of an ongoing battle to mitigate flooding of homes, businesses and streets in the city, the mayor said.

In September 2009, flash flooding in the city occurred when more than three inches of rain fell in about 45 minutes, flooding several homes and closing at least four streets.

Afterwards a large ditch which runs along Valley View Drive was cleaned out and widened as part of a endeavor to mitigate damage caused by flash flooding in that area. The city Street Department also installed new culverts along Martin Luther King Drive to mitigate flooding in that area.

In late 2010, city firefighters had to use a boat to check on several houses on Hopson Avenue after flooding raised water levels. No one needed to be rescued.