Kids Over Everything, in it’s fifth year, is an end of summer function attended  by more than 1,000 this year and geared toward providing school supplies to area students and allowing them to interact with the likes of Shay Hodge, above left, the former Ole Miss wide-receiver from Morton who spent a few years in the NFL and coaches at Provine. At right is Kynj Carter, 6 getting an autograph from Hodge.
Kids Over Everything, in it’s fifth year, is an end of summer function attended by more than 1,000 this year and geared toward providing school supplies to area students and allowing them to interact with the likes of Shay Hodge, above left, the former Ole Miss wide-receiver from Morton who spent a few years in the NFL and coaches at Provine. At right is Kynj Carter, 6 getting an autograph from Hodge.

Teaching kids not only about healthier eating habits but also about ways they can improve their overall health in just a few simple steps is part of a partnership between the Boys and Girls Club and the county hospital.




Neshoba County General Hospital and Nursing Home and the Boys and Girls Club of Neshoba County recently teamed up reaching about 150 kids from age 5 to 18. They were taught what types of foods are healthy choices for snacks, how to make healthy snacks for themselves and basic hygiene techniques to avoid illness.

Dr. Julia Riley, a pediatrician with Neshoba General, led the hospital’s efforts in the program, which was held at the Boys and Girls Club on July 16.

“It was really a group effort which came about as part of our recent Community Health Needs Assessment,” Riley said. “Healthy eating, which leads to a healthy life, starts with kids. Many times when kids learn they pass on these things to their parents.”

Riley said that the Boys and Girls Club was an obvious choice to partner in the project.

Boys and Girls Club organizer Danielle Spurlock said that when asked to participate by Dr. Riley, she immediately agreed.

“Healthy eating habits are part of our national Boys and Girls Club program, so it fit right in with what we were already doing,” Spurlock said. “We have done several lessons on healthy eating here including tastings with fruits and vegetables to familiarize kids with healthier eating options.”

Spurlock said the hospital reinforced some of the club’s previous lessons, especially in effective handwashing.

“They (the kids) learned the importance of washing your hands to wash germs and bacteria off,” Spurlock said. “Dr. Riley had them sing their alphabet, so they knew how long to wash their hands.”

“Generally we want kids to wash their hands for around 30 seconds,” Riley said. “Having them sing their alphabet lets them know the right amount of time to wash and lets them have fun doing it.”

Riley said they also had students make their own healthy snacks including snacks perhaps some of the kids hadn’t tried before.

“It was great to see a lot of the kids willing to try something they hadn’t tried before,” Riley said.

Riley and Spurlock both said they hope to continue with similar programs in the future.

“We definitely plan to do more in the future,” Riley said.

“We have given them (the hospital) an open invitation,” she said. “We always love to have local folks come and help educate our children.”