(BPT) - With colder months arriving, there are a few things on everybody's minds: festive treats, gift shopping and of course, time spent with family and friends. As many people look forward to the holiday season, asthma sufferers need to be aware and prepared for all the triggers this time of the year can bring. The change in weather, traveling or being in a relative's home with new allergens can all trigger an asthma attack.

Charmayne Anderson has been living with asthma for as long as she can remember. Now, as Director of Advocacy at the Allergy and Asthma Network, she educates others on how to prepare for an asthma attack and enjoy life - and the holidays - unencumbered by their condition. After living with asthma through childhood, adolescence and now adulthood, she has witnessed an evolution of asthma medications and respiratory treatments firsthand.

'When I was diagnosed with asthma as a child, there were no inhalers or similar treatments for us to take home,' Anderson said. 'My parents would have to take me for after-hours emergency care visits for an injection to help get my breathing under control.'

Anderson, along with the approximately 25 million asthma patients in the U.S., has more advanced and effective treatment options today to help manage symptoms and asthma attacks. For most people with asthma, having a rescue inhaler on-hand at all times is crucial, whether at home or on the go. Since asthma triggers may change frequently, it's difficult to predict when an attack could strike. Particularly at this time of year, walking in the chilly winter air could be enough to cause wheezing and shortness of breath.

'For someone who has asthma, it can be a life-or-death situation. When you're experiencing an attack, even if it's minor, if you can't get relief immediately it just escalates and becomes even greater,' said Anderson. 'Having my rescue inhaler with me at all times and being able to check the dose counter is critical.'

One modern feature of asthma inhalers that has been especially helpful for Anderson and others areis dose counters integrated into rescue inhalers. For Anderson, dose counters serve as a forewarning that her inhaler is running low. Such a seemingly small reminder has certainly made a big difference; Anderson believes dose counters have helped her be more proactive in filling her prescription and being aware how much medication is left.

Every year, asthma accounts for 10.5 million doctor visits and 1.6 million emergency room visits in the United States. By utilizing dose counters and maintaining an asthma treatment plan, asthma sufferers like Anderson can help avoid emergency situations like these and travel with some confidence knowing they're prepared.

Anderson said, 'Prior to using a rescue inhaler with a dose counter built in, there were many times when I was away, out or not necessarily paying attention to how much medicine was in my inhaler. I'd get to a point when I would need it and I realized there was nothing in it, and I'd scramble to refill it.'

Now, when it comes time to travel for the holidays, the number one thing on Anderson's to-do list is to make sure her and her children's inhalers are filled.

'Before heading out of town I check everyone's dose counter to make sure there is enough medication,' said Anderson. 'Reaching out to a pharmacy while you're traveling for the holidays is hard, especially when you're experiencing an asthma attack and in an emergency situation.'

For additional information on the importance of dose counters, visit KnowYourCount.com.

Ms. Anderson has been compensated for her time in contributing to this program.

RESP-41556

September 2017