James Baysinger and his wife, Chrissy, along with their sons, Hayden, Logan and Kolson, enjoy living on their farm near House. James, who works offshore, loves to cook when he is home. Some of his specialty dishes are wild game recipes. His cooking will be on display Tuesday during the Wildlife Jamboree which will be held at the Neshoba County Coliseum.
James Baysinger and his wife, Chrissy, along with their sons, Hayden, Logan and Kolson, enjoy living on their farm near House. James, who works offshore, loves to cook when he is home. Some of his specialty dishes are wild game recipes. His cooking will be on display Tuesday during the Wildlife Jamboree which will be held at the Neshoba County Coliseum.
James Baysinger, his wife, Chrissy, and their three sons enjoy farm life on her family property near the House Community.

While maybe not totally, you could say they live off the land in beautiful wooded area. They enjoy hunting all sorts of game. They have a garden and a few cows. And James can cook with the best of them; his specialty is wild game.

“I enjoy cooking,” Baysinger said. “I have been cooking for years. I do a lot of cooking when I am home. I believe in cooking the meat slow and at low heat.”           

Baysinger, a 1997 graduate of Neshoba Central, has worked offshore since he graduated from high school. His schedule has him at home for a month and away for a month.

At first, he worked on rigs in the Gulf of Mexico. He was in the Gulf when Hurricane Katrina struck the Mississippi and Louisiana Gulf Coast in 2005.

“I was working off the coast of Texas when Katrina struck,” Baysinger said. “I was out of the path of the hurricane. But we had to stay an extra week because of it.”

Later, he started working overseas. At first, he worked near Egypt. But now he works in Trinidad, which is located off the South American coast and is about a 5 ½ hour commute from Houston.

“It’s not bad,” Baysinger said. “I fly out of Houston. The people there are good. When we go in, we stay at the hotel for a day and then go out the rig. I have been going there since 2015.”

When he is home, Baysinger likes to work around the farm and hunt. He says he is not much on fishing.

“When we go, my job is usually to bait hooks and untangle lines,” Baysinger said. “And usually, the fish don’t bite often enough. That’s not a lot of fun.

“I like to deer hunt. We hunt squirrels, rabbits and deer. We have a dove hunt each year. And I like to turkey hunt sometimes,” Baysinger said. “We used to hunt wild hogs but they aren’t so plentiful around here as they were a few years ago.”

“He always has a project going on,” Chrissy said. “When he is home, he is never in the house. He is outside, working on something around the barn.”

James and Chrissy have been married for 12 years. She is a nurse and comes from a family of nurses. She was raised on the land they live on. Their sons, Hayden, Logan and Kolson, now roam that land when they aren’t attending school at Neshoba Central. James has an 18-year-old son, Bradley Baysinger, who spends time hunting and being around the farm, too.

“The only thing we worry about is the snakes,” Chrissy said. “We are always telling the boys to watch where they step because the snakes are pretty bad out here. The only people you see out here are the ones who live here and the ones who are lost.

“The boys have their trails and different things going on. If you go out during the day, you can hear them playing. They will come through every now and then to check in.”

The family attends the Antioch Baptist Church, and the boys participate in Boy Scouts. They regularly attend the Neshoba County Fair. Her family owns Cabin 183 which is the Skinner cabin.

James’ cooking will be on display Tuesday at the annual Wildlife Jamboree, which will be held at the Neshoba County Coliseum. He will be cooking in the “Taste of Wild” part of the jamboree. It all starts around 4:30 p.m. and last until 8 p.m.

Here are some of James’ favorite recipes.



Squirrel dumplings

squirrel 4-5

can biscuits-whoppin biscuits 4 cans

Boil squirrel for 45 minutes. Debone, and put on pot. Pull biscuits into quarter size pieces. Put in pot with meat. Add liquid from squirrel boil. Season with salt and pepper. Cook on medium to low heat for 30 minutes stirring often.

Baked Raccoon

1 coon

2 sweet potatoes

seasoning-grillmates applewood rub

Clean coon. rub down with applewood/mesquite pork rub. Cut up potatoes. Put 1 potato in coon. Put other potato around outside of coon. Wrap coon in foil. Cook on pan with rack. Put a little water in pan. Put coon on rack. Cook at 300 degrees for 5 hrs.

Deer Steak Wrap

tenderized deer steak 20 pieces

Italian dressing

Dales seasoning

sliced jalapeno peppers 1 jar

sliced banana peppers 1 jar

bacon 2 pks

cream cheese 1 pack

Soak steaks overnight in Dales and Italian dressing. Drain meat. put 1/3 spoonful of cream cheese and a pepper on each steak. Put jalapeno on half of the steaks and banana peppers on the other half. Roll up steaks. wrap bacon around steak and secure with toothpicks. Place in pan and cover with foil. cook at 300 degrees for 1 hour. Drain juices and cook an additional 25 minutes.



Fried Deer Steak in Mushroom Gravy

deer steak

2 can of cream of mushroom

2-3 packs of brown gravy mix

onion

Italian drsg

Dales seasoning

flour

Tony's chachers

Soak steaks in dales and Italian dressing for 1 hour. Mix flour and Tony's 1 tbsp in a bowl. Batter meat in  flour mix. Fry meat for 2 minutes. Put fried meat in dish. Mix up gravy and add 1 cans of cream of mushroom to gravy. Pour over meat. Slice an onion and put on top. Bake at 350 degrees for 1 hour. Serve over rice and with homemade biscuits.



Deer Neck Roast

fresh deer neck

Tony chacheres creole seasoning

4 pks of brown gravy mix

2 cans cream of mushroom soup

1 bag small potatoes

1 onion

1 bag of carrots

Mix brown gravy, add 1 cans of cream of mushroom. Pour in crockpot. Season neck roast with Tony’s, out in crockpot. Cook on high for 8 hours. Add potatoes, carrots, a d onion 2 hours before being done