Recently the Neshoba County Board of Supervisors nominated Mr. Randy Gill (third from right) as Neshoba County’s private sector representative to the Twin District Workforce Development Board.  Mr. Gill is pictured with board members Kevin Cumberland, Jerry Goforth, Obbie Riley, Allen White and Keith Lillis.
Recently the Neshoba County Board of Supervisors nominated Mr. Randy Gill (third from right) as Neshoba County’s private sector representative to the Twin District Workforce Development Board. Mr. Gill is pictured with board members Kevin Cumberland, Jerry Goforth, Obbie Riley, Allen White and Keith Lillis.
Internet sales tax diversions would contribute to an estimated combined gain of nearly $1 million for Philadelphia and Neshoba County annually, thanks to a bill passed last week by the state Legislature and signed into law by Gov. Phil Bryant during a special session.

The Mississippi Infrastructure Modernization Act will divert a portion of use taxes to cities and counties.

Current estimates are that Philadelphia will receive about $350,000 annually, while Neshoba County would receive about $600,000, according to state Sen. Jenifer Branning, a Republican from Philadelphia.

According to Branning, the act will divert 35 percent of the 7 percent use tax for internet and out-of-state sales for the purpose of infrastructure improvements for local governments and for bridge repairs.

The money will further be divided with 15 percent going to the cities in the state, 15 percent to the counties, and 5 percent to the Local System Bridge Program.

The act will also divert tax money from the newly-approved casino sports betting for the purpose of infrastructure improvements.

The act also creates a new tax on hybrid and electric cars.

State Rep. C. Scott Bounds, a Republican of Philadelphia, said that infrastructure has been an important topic for some time.

“We have been dealing with the infrastructure issue for several years,” Bounds said.

“For the next 10 years at least, the cities and counties of our state are going to be well taken care of. For five days of work, I think we did good work for the citizens of the state.”