Forest and June Fulton smile at their great-grandson Gunner on Saturday as he is held by grandmother Lee Anne Burt Fulton as they practice social distancing amid the coronavirus pandemic. The Fultons face another month of isolation.
Forest and June Fulton smile at their great-grandson Gunner on Saturday as he is held by grandmother Lee Anne Burt Fulton as they practice social distancing amid the coronavirus pandemic. The Fultons face another month of isolation.

Brenda Gordon was concerned about going to radiation and chemo treatment five days a week when Neshoba County residents were being asked to stay home for two weeks — and now a month.

 

“It’s pretty tuff getting out,” she said. “And trying to take of my grandson and brother that has to be helped like a child. 

 

“I just thank God for waking us up every day. Just doing the best I can. But we all got each other.”

 

Neshoba countians are coping with the coronavirus in creative ways as the health recommendations to practice social distancing strains close family ties so many Neshoba countians have enjoyed for centuries.

 

The extended Burt family has gathered on Burt Hill off Mississippi 21 on Sunday evenings for half a century, but they’re limiting the group out of health concerns for patriarch Papa John Burt.

 

“It was a much different Sunday night on Burt Hill,” said Lee Ann Burt Fulton, a retired Philadelphia Public Schools teacher and administrator whose husband Jim is a city alderman. “We ALWAYS gather there on Sunday night and it is a treasured time for all of us.”

 

“I am going to need my Sunday nights back really soon,” she said. “Dad and I FaceTimed John and Susan this morning. When we hung up he asked if I really believed that was them. I said well yes. They were at their house. He said so they were really looking at us. I said yes. He shook his head and said, ‘I don’t know about that.’”

 

She took her grandson Gunner to see the “greats” on her husband’s side Saturday morning.  “We had to find another way this morning,” she said posting a picture on Facebook of the Fultons, Forest and June, in their carport smiling at their great-great grandson from a distance along with one of Forest waiving at Gunner through a window.

 

“Making it work but I’m about tired of all this virus is taking from us and it’s not jobs and all those things I’m talking about either, she said. “It’s the time with those we love the most.  I have not seen my Burt family in two weeks and it looks like it’s going to be another few weeks.”

 

Pam Fortenberry-Sims reported they are doing fine. They’ve been keeping grand babies while her son is still working. 

 

“Our Walmart I think has done very well with keeping most things in stock,” she said. She said the bread companies need to step, but added that’s OK because, “I know how to bake my own.”

 

Lisa Camario said, “I’m doing fine at least I’m not sick,” noting, “We live for Jesus Christ our Father God.

 

Nelda Johnson said, “It’s all the same still do my work ever day still. Thank my God he wakes me up to see another beautiful day.”

 

Valerie Hardy said that Valley View Barbershop and Furbabies is closed. “We are in our 60’s and are blessed to keep our four grandchildren while school is out as much as possible,” she said.

 

Their sons and their wives are all healthcare professionals.

 

Last Monday they began homeschooling one hour in the morning and one hour in the evening. 

 

“Planning a lot of outdoor learning activities with planting, growing, soils...cattle farming..endless activities with Granny and Grandad,” she said.